Who Was A Citizen In Ancient Athens?

Who were citizens in ancient Athens?

The Athenian definition of “citizens” was also different from modern-day citizens: only free men were considered citizens in Athens.

Women, children, and slaves were not considered citizens and therefore could not vote.

Each year 500 names were chosen from all the citizens of ancient Athens..

How did you become a citizen in ancient Athens?

To be classed as a citizen in fifth-century Athens you had to be male, born from two Athenian parents and over eighteen years old, and complete your military service. Women, slaves, metics and children were not allowed to become citizens.

Which right was enjoyed by the citizens of ancient Athens?

Citizenship was not dependent on wealth, influence or occupation. All Athenian citizens had the right to vote in the Assembly, debate, own land and own slaves. All Athenian citizens were expected to have military training, be educated, pay their taxes and serve Athens in times of war.

Did Sparta allow foreigners?

Sparta: In Sparta non-citizens were women, slaves (called the helots), and Perioikoi (free men, usually foreigners). … Spartan slaves, called, helots, did all the farming for the Spartans.

What were the two main city states of ancient Greece?

Of these, Athens and Sparta were the two most powerful city-states. Athens was a democracy and Sparta had two kings and an oligarchic system, but both were important in the development of Greek society and culture.

Who were citizens of ancient Athens quizlet?

Who was considered a citizen in Ancient Greece? Men over the age of 18 with Athenian parents who owned land. Women, children, slaves, and metics (foreigners) were not considered citizens. This term means foreigners in Athens.

Who were slaves in Athens?

Athenian slaves were the property of their master (or of the state), who could dispose of them as he saw fit. He could give, sell, rent, or bequeath them. A slave could have a spouse and child, but the slave family was not recognized by the state, and the master could scatter the family members at any time.

Which groups were considered citizens in ancient Greece?

Citizens in Ancient Greece were usually men who were born in that city. Women, slaves and (usually) residents born elsewhere, didn’t have the right to vote. Tenant farmers were only allowed to vote for whoever they were ordered to vote for by their master.

How were citizens treated in Athens?

Male citizens in Athens could vote on all the decisions that affected the city and serve on juries. However, democracy was not open to everyone. Citizen women and children were not allowed to vote. Slaves and foreigners living in Athens (known as metics) were banned from participating in government.

What did democracy really mean in Athens?

Athens in the 5th to 4th century BCE had an extraordinary system of government: democracy. Under this system, all male citizens had equal political rights, freedom of speech, and the opportunity to participate directly in the political arena.

Who were considered citizens in the democracy of ancient Athens?

Greek democracy created at Athens was direct, rather than representative: any adult male citizen over the age of 20 could take part, and it was a duty to do so. The officials of the democracy were in part elected by the Assembly and in large part chosen by lottery in a process called sortition.

How were non citizens treated in Athens?

The representatives from Athens and Sparta will now describe their treatment of non-citizens, specifically women and slaves. … That includes acquiring and training household servants, preparing meals, and sometimes nursing sick slaves.

Who were metics in Athenian society?

Metic, Greek Metoikos, in ancient Greece, any of the resident aliens, including freed slaves. Metics were found in most states except Sparta. In Athens, where they were most numerous, they occupied an intermediate position between visiting foreigners and citizens, having both privileges and duties.

Where did ancient Greek slaves sleep?

Living Quarters Slaves usually lived on their master’s property, most often in communal structures that tended to be primitively constructed and furnished. Some domestic slaves might have been privileged to sleep in the master’s house, such as a wet-nurse, the children’s primary caregiver, or a female concubine.

Who did the Spartans enslave?

Helot, a state-owned serf of the ancient Spartans. The ethnic origin of helots is uncertain, but they were probably the original inhabitants of Laconia (the area around the Spartan capital) who were reduced to servility after the conquest of their land by the numerically fewer Dorians.