When To Use Was Or Were In A Sentence?

Was or were used in a sentence?

Was is used in the first person singular (I) and the third person singular (he, she, it).

Were is used in the second person singular and plural (you, your, yours) and first and third person plural (we, they).

I was driving to the park.

You were drinking some water..

Is you was a correct grammar?

“Was” and “Were” as Past and Subjunctive Verb Tenses You can’t go wrong choosing were with the second person (you), the first person plural (we), the second person plural (you), or the third person plural (they).

Is if I were a boy grammatically correct?

This is an example of the subjunctive mood in English, which is rare. We use it to state something that is contrary to fact. When she says “If I were a boy” she is actually a girl, so she is imagining she were a boy. It’s rare and many people would just say “If I was a boy,” which is technically wrong but common.

Can we use were with she?

We use “was” with I, he, she, it when speaking of the past: it is the singular past form of the verb “to be”. We use “were” with you and they and we: it is the plural past form. But sometimes we can use “were” with I (he, she, it): I wish I were a sailor.

Which is correct have or had?

If you have a sentence in the past tense well it’s good news, because no matter what subject you have, you will always use had. So here They had a car. That means they don’t have a car now – They had a car in the past. But we’re using had because it’s in the past tense.

Were True or true?

The difference is, for the first and third person singular you use ‘was’ , thus ‘I was’ and ‘he/she/it was’, but you use ‘were’ for the second person singular and the plural, so for ‘you were’ and ‘we/you/they were’ . Both forms are evidently past tense versions of ‘to be’.

Is it easy or were easy?

‘Were’ is the correct form, though it is probably heard equally, or perhaps less often than ‘was’.

Which is correct grammatically correct if I was or if I were?

Many people use if I was and if I were interchangeably to describe a hypothetical situation. The confusion occurs because when writing in the past tense, I was is correct while I were is incorrect. However, when writing about non-realistic or hypothetical situations, if I were is the only correct choice.

Is if she were correct grammar?

“If she was” is past tense, indicative mood. It describes something that happened or may have happened in the past. … “If she were” is present tense, subjunctive mood. It describes a hypothetical situation that is not true.

Why do you say if I were?

The reason we use WERE instead of WAS is because the sentence is in the SUBJUNCTIVE mood which is used for hypothetical situations. This is a condition which is contrary to fact or reality (the fact is, I am NOT you). In the subjunctive mood we use IF + I / HE / SHE / IT + WERE for the verb To Be.

Is it grammatically correct to say if I were you?

From my research online the correct way is to say “If I were you” and not “If I was you” because this is the “subjunctive mood”. However they don’t say the underlying reason for it. They just say use “If I were you” when it is subjunctive.

Had Should were instead of if?

was / were – We often use were instead of was after if. Both was and were are used in formal English, but only was is used in informal English. If I were you……If vs. Were / Had / Should.WITHOUT IFCONDITIONMAIN CLAUSEWere I you,I wouldn’t get involved.Had I known,I would have said something.2 more rows

What if there were or was?

If I had run the race, I would feel accomplished. In both sentences above, the “if” clause contains a form of the past tense of the verb. … If the verb in the if clause is “to be,” use “were,” even if the subject of the clause is a third person singular subject (i.e., he, she, it).