Question: Who Validates The Presidential Election?

Does a bill go to the house first?

Laws begin as ideas.

First, a representative sponsors a bill.

Again, a simple majority (51 of 100) passes the bill.

Finally, a conference committee made of House and Senate members works out any differences between the House and Senate versions of the bill..

What are 3 major flaws in the electoral college?

Three criticisms of the College are made: It is “undemocratic;” It permits the election of a candidate who does not win the most votes; and. Its winner-takes-all approach cancels the votes of the losing candidates in each state.

Was the 12th Amendment repealed?

AMENDMENT XX Passed by Congress March 2, 1932. Ratified January 23, 1933. … In addition, a portion of the 12th amendment was superseded by section 3.

What is the 11 Amendment in simple terms?

What is this amendment in simple terms? The Eleventh Amendment says that U.S. courts can’t hear cases and make decisions against a state if the state is sued by a citizen who lives in another state or by a person who lives in another country.

Does the president choose the vice president?

Instead, presidential elections use the Electoral College. To win the election, a candidate must receive a majority of electoral votes. In the event no candidate receives a majority, the House of Representatives chooses the president and the Senate chooses the vice president.

What is difference between House and Senate?

Senators represent their entire states, but members of the House represent individual districts. The number of districts in each state is determined by a state’s population. … Today, Congress consists of 100 senators (two from each state) and 435 voting members of the House of Representatives.

Who has more power President or Senate?

The Senate has exceptionally high authority, sometimes higher than the President or the House of Representatives. The Senate can try cases of impeachment, which can dismiss a President for misconduct.

Why did the Founders create the Electoral College?

The Electoral College was created by the framers of the U.S. Constitution as an alternative to electing the president by popular vote or by Congress. … Several weeks after the general election, electors from each state meet in their state capitals and cast their official vote for president and vice president.

Who has the power to elect the president?

The House has several powers assigned exclusively to it, including the power to initiate revenue bills, impeach federal officials, and elect the President in the case of an electoral college tie. The Senate is composed of 100 Senators, 2 for each state.

Who elects the Electoral College?

Instead, the election of the president of the United States is a two-step process. First, voters cast ballots on Election Day in each state. In nearly every state, the candidate who gets the most votes wins the “electoral votes” for that state, and gets that number of voters (or “electors”) in the “Electoral College.”

Who ultimately elects the president?

With 538 Electors, a candidate must receive at least 270 votes to be elected to the office of President or Vice President. Should no presidential candidate receive an absolute majority, the House of Representatives determines who the next President will be.

What does Amendment 12 say?

Passed by Congress December 9, 1803, and ratified June 15, 1804, the 12th Amendment provided for separate Electoral College votes for President and Vice President, correcting weaknesses in the earlier electoral system which were responsible for the controversial Presidential Election of 1800.

Why do we only have 435 seats in the House?

Beginning in 1790, after each census, Congress enacted a law that specified the changes in the actual number of Representatives. … Because the House wanted a manageable number of members, Congress twice set the size of the House at 435 voting members.

How is electoral college votes determined?

Electoral votes are allocated among the States based on the Census. Every State is allocated a number of votes equal to the number of senators and representatives in its U.S. Congressional delegation—two votes for its senators in the U.S. Senate plus a number of votes equal to the number of its Congressional districts.